In Solar Buzz
By David Roberts for Vox

One of the reasons I think solar photovoltaic power is going to take over the world is that it is scalable in a way no other power source can be. It can be used to build multi-hundred-megawatt power plants, or it can be scaled down. Way down.

How far down? Try less than the width of a human hair.

Solar cells are getting ridonkulously small

South Korean scientists have created solar PV cells that are 1 micrometer thick, hundreds of times thinner than most PV and half again as thin as other kinds of thin-film PV. (The research is in a paper published in Applied Physics Letters last June.)

The cells are made with gallium arsenide as the semiconductor, “cold welded” directly onto a metal substrate, with no adhesive to make them thicker. Remarkably, they produce roughly as much power as thicker PV cells, though in testing, “the cells could wrap around a radius as small as 1.4 millimeters.”

With cells this thin, solar PV can be integrated in all sorts of “wearables” — clothes, glasses, hats, or backpacks with solar cells integrated, continuously feeding power to our portable electronics. More to the point, PV could be integrated into just about anything.

Read the rest of the article here.
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